Welcome

Many say that Trump needs to win in 2020 to stay out of prison. The reality of a criminal prosecution of Trump after office is nearly certain according to some. While there are reports of tax dodges, illegal campaign contributions, and improper foreign contributions, for now, those are just reports.

There are many federal prosecutors that claim there is “an overwhelming case” that the president engaged in obstruction of justice.

Several associates are in prison or headed there now for this crime. Roger Stone was the seventh person to be convicted and sentenced for crimes unearthed by former special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

What did Trump do wrong? According to many federal prosecutors, the strongest count would be his attempt to fire Mueller. He tried to fire the man appointed to investigate interference in the 2016 election and the possibility that the Trump campaign conspired to do it.

Very simply, obstruction of justice is when someone acts to undermine an investigation with the intent to do so, and there can be no serious question that firing Mueller would have curtailed the investigation.

Weeks earlier, White House counsel Don McGahn warned Trump about his “trying to meddle in the investigation” and that “knocking out Mueller” would be “another fact used to claim obstruction of justice.”

When your lawyer tells you that doing something could be a crime and you do it anyway, that is extremely strong evidence of your criminal intent—“substantial” evidence, in Mueller’s own words.

Fact: In the second volume of his 448-page report, Mueller sets forth evidence of obstruction of justice that any competent federal prosecutor could use to draft an indictment. And Mueller made it clear himself that his detailed report was intended, in part, to “preserve the evidence” because “a President does not have immunity after he leaves office.”

Some of the potential charges are so strong that they are virtually certain to be included in any indictment of Trump. They’re strong enough that over 1,000 former federal prosecutors signed a letter stating that Trump would be indicted if he were not president. Fact.

Can he pardon himself?

All The President’s Men

Longtime Trump associate Roger Stone was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes that include obstruction of justice, lying to Congress and witness tampering.

He is the seventh person to be convicted and sentenced for crimes unearthed by former special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

His case has been at the heart of ongoing tensions between President Trump and his Justice Department.

Suspected criminal activity among Trump associates extends beyond Mueller’s Russia probe. Federal prosecutors are investigating the president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani’s personal business dealings in Ukraine.

Sentenced:
  • Former Trump 2016 campaign chairman Paul Manafort: Sentenced to 7.5 years in prison this March for bank and tax fraud and crimes related to his work as a political consultant in Ukraine.
  • Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen: Received a three-year prison sentence in Dec. 2018 for tax evasion, bank fraud, lying to Congress and campaign finance violations.
  • Former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos: Convicted of lying to investigators about about Russian contacts. He served 12 days in prison and in October, filed to run for former Rep. Katie Hill’s California seat.
  • Richard Pinedo: The California man was sentenced to six months in prison in Oct. 2018 for selling bank account numbers to Russians who engaged in election interference. He has no known connection to Trump.
  • Dutch attorney Alex van der Zwaan: Pleaded guilty to lying to federal investigators about his work for law firm Skadden, Arps, Meagher, & Flom LLP and Affiliates in 2012. He was sentenced to 30 days in prison and a $20,000 fine.
  • Ex-Trump campaign deputy chairman Rick Gates: Pleaded guilty in Feb. 2018 to conspiracy and lying to the FBI. After cooperating extensively in multiple investigations, Gates was sentenced in December to 45 days in jail, three years of probation and 300 hours of community service.
  • Roger Stone: Sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes that include obstruction of justice, lying to Congress and witness tampering. A federal jury convicted Stone last year after he lied to Congress about his efforts to learn more about when WikiLeaks would publish damaging emails about Hillary Clinton during the 2016 presidential election.
Avoids sentencing:
  • Former national security adviser Michael Flynn: The retired three-star general pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI in Dec. 2017. Barr ends up dismissing the charges against General Flynn.

Lawsuits around United States Constitution

  • Lawsuit alleging violations of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
    • Knight First Amendment Institute v. Trump
    • PEN America v. Trump
    • CNN v. Trump
  • Lawsuit alleging violations of the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
    • New York v. Trump (the DACA lawsuit)
  • Lawsuit alleging violations of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution
    • Stone v. Trump
  • Lawsuits alleging violations of the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the United States Constitution
    • CREW v. Trump
    • D.C. and Maryland v. Trump
    • Blumenthal v. Trump
  • U.S. Constitutional case law lawsuit filed by the United States House Committee on the Judiciary to compel the testimony of former White House Counsel Donald F. McGahn, Jr. under subpoena.
    • In re: Don McGahn

Lawsuits around Executive Orders

Lawsuit around Presidential Proclamations

Lawsuits around Presidential Memorandums

Lawsuits around potential legal violations

Lawsuits around the United States Census

Lawsuits around Trump political campaigns

  • Lawsuit alleging that the Trump Campaign used mass, unsolicited communication of promotional messages that the plaintiffs did not consent to receive
    • Thorne v. Donald J Trump for President Inc.
  • Lawsuit alleging Russian interference in the 2016 Federal Elections, the Trump campaign was accused of engaging in a racketeering enterprise in conjunction with Russia and WikiLeaks
  • Lawsuit regarding a pattern of persistent illegal conduct, occurring over more than a decade, that includes extensive unlawful political coordination with the Trump presidential campaign, repeated and willful self-dealing transactions to benefit Mr. Trump’s personal and business interests, and violations of basic legal obligations for non-profit foundations
  • Lawsuit in which plaintiffs alleged Trump’s security team assaulted them during a 2015 peaceful protest based around Trump’s campaign comments about Black Lives Matter and Mexican immigrants
  • Lawsuit alleging Trump encouraged an atmosphere of violence and anti-Trump protesters were subjected to attacks and racial slurs being led out of a campaign rally in 2016
    • Nwanguma v. Trump
  • Lawsuit alleging that Trump and the Republican National Committee colluded to prevent any competition to Trump’s re-election campaign.
    • Roque De La Fuente v. Trump & Republican National Committee 

Lawsuits around potential sexual misconduct and assault

  • Lawsuit by Katie Johnson which alleges that Trump and Jeffrey Epstein sexually and physically abused her under threats to physically harm her and her family while a 13-year-old minor from June–September 1994
    • Katie Johnson v. Donald J Trump and Jeffrey E Epstein (dismissed)
  • Lawsuit by Jane Doe which alleges Trump and Epstein engaged in forcible rape, imprisonment and assault while she was 13-year-old minor and another 12-year-old girl in 1994
    • Jane Doe v. Donald Trump & Jeffrey E Epstein (dismissed by Doe)
  • Lawsuit by former campaign staffer, Alva Johnson, who claims that Trump forcibly kissed her at a rally in Florida in August 2016, the lawsuit also alleges unequal pay standards for her an African-American woman compared to others on the team
    • Johnson v. Trump
  • Defamation lawsuit raised by Summer Zervos which arose from Trump’s statement that she lied about sexual assault allegations against him
    • Zervos v. Trump
  • Defamation lawsuit raised by E. Jean Carroll which arose from Trump’s denials of her accusation that he sexually assaulted her more than 20 years ago damaged her reputation
    • Carroll v. Trump

Lawsuits around financial manipulation and employee payment

  • Lawsuit alleging violations of employee payment regarding not paying him for “thousands of hours of overtime” to which he was legally entitled during his more than two decades of service
    • Cintron v. Trump Organization
  • Lawsuit alleging that Trump and his adult children had made a large amount of money by encouraging unsophisticated investors to join fraudulent schemes

Lawsuits around Trumps financial and tax information

  • Appeal lawsuit against the Mazars accounting firm, in an effort to have Trump’s financial information kept private
  • Appeal lawsuit against the Deutsche Bank and Capital One Bank from fulfilling the subpoenas issued to the company by the House Financial Services and Intelligence committees for Trumps, his adult children, and his businesses financial records
  • Case before the Supreme Court of the United States: Does a grand-jury subpoena by a state District Attorney for the President’s financial records violate Article II and the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution?
  • Case in D.C. court challenging the New York TRUST Act, which gives Congress the right to obtain tax information on New York residents. Case dismissed November 11, 2019.
    • Donald J. Trump v. Committee on Ways and Means

Lawsuits around environmental concerns

All current pending prosecution

The Women

Here are all of the allegations — in chronological order — made by 25 named women:


Jessica Leeds

Jessica Leeds

NBC News

Allegations:

Jessica Leeds told the New York Times in October 2016 that Trump reached his hand up her skirt and groped her while seated next to her on a flight in the late 1970s.

“He was like an octopus. His hands were everywhere,” Leeds said, adding that she fled to the back of the plane.

During an interview on NBC News’ “Megyn Kelly Today” in December, Leeds added that she was at a gala in New York three years after the incident on the plane when she ran into Trump, who recognized her and called her a c—.

“He called me the worst name ever,” she said. “It was shocking. It was like a bucket of cold water being thrown over me.”

Trump’s response: 

Trump denied the allegations and during a rally in October 2016, suggested that Leeds wasn’t attractive enough for him to assault.

“People that are willing to say, ‘Oh, I was with Donald Trump in 1980, I was sitting with him on an airplane, and he went after me,'” Trump said. “Believe me, she would not be my first choice.”

Ivana Trump

Donald Ivana Trump
Donald Trump and his former wife, Ivana, pose outside the Federal Courthouse after she was sworn in as a United States citizen in May 1988. 
Reuters

Allegations:

In a 1990 divorce deposition, Trump’s first wife and the mother of his three eldest children Ivana Trump accused her then-husband of raping her in a fit of rage in 1989.

Ivana said Trump attacked her after he underwent a painful “scalp reduction” procedure done by a doctor she had recommended, tearing her clothes and yanking out a chunk of her hair.

“Then he jams his penis inside her for the first time in more than 16 months. Ivana is terrified … It is a violent assault,” Harry Hurt III, who obtained a copy of the deposition, wrote in a 1993 book about Trump. “According to versions she repeats to some of her closest confidantes, ‘he raped me.'”

Ivana later slightly altered her allegation, saying that while she felt “violated” on that occasion, she hadn’t accused Trump of raping her “in a literal or criminal sense.”

“[O]n one occasion during 1989, Mr. Trump and I had marital relations in which he behaved very differently toward me than he had during our marriage,” Ivana wrote in a 1993 statement. “As a woman, I felt violated, as the love and tenderness, which he normally exhibited towards me, was absent. I referred to this as a ‘rape,’ but I do not want my words to be interpreted in a literal or criminal sense.”

Ivana is mother to Donald Jr., Eric, and Ivanka Trump.

Trump’s response:

Trump called Hurt’s description of Ivana’s allegation “obviously false” in 1993, according to Newsday. Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, argued in 2015 that his client could not have raped Ivana because “you cannot rape your spouse.”

“There’s very clear case law,” he said.

Cohen later recanted, saying his comment was “inarticulate.”

Kristin Anderson

Kristin Anderson

Screenshot/Washington Post

Allegations:

Kristin Anderson, a photographer and former model said Trump reached under her skirt and touched her vagina through her underwear at a New York City nightclub in the early 1990s.

Anderson, then in her early 20s, said she wasn’t talking with Trump at the time and didn’t realize he was sitting next to her when he groped her without her consent.

“So, the person on my right who, unbeknownst to me at that time was Donald Trump, put their hand up my skirt. He did touch my vagina through my underwear, absolutely. And as I pushed the hand away and I got up and I turned around and I see these eyebrows, very distinct eyebrows, of Donald Trump,” she told The Washington Post in October 2016.

Anderson said she and her friends, who were talking together around a table at the time of the incident, were “very grossed out and weirded out,” but thought “Okay, Donald is gross. We all know he’s gross. Let’s just move on.”

Trump’s response:

“Mr. Trump strongly denies this phony allegation by someone looking to get some free publicity,” Hope Hicks, the president’s then-spokeswoman and current White House communications director, told the Post in October 2016. “It is totally ridiculous.”

Jill Harth

Jill Harth

Screenshot/Inside Edition

Allegations:

Jill Harth, a businesswoman who worked with Trump in the 1990s, told the Guardian in July 2016 that Trump pushed her against a wall, put his hand up her skirt, and tried to kiss her at a dinner at his Mar-a-Lago resort in the early 1990s.

“He was relentless,” she told the New York Times. “I didn’t know how to handle it. I would go away from him and say I have to go to the restroom. It was the escape route.”

Harth sued Trump in 1997 both for sexual harassment and for failing to uphold his end of a business deal with Harth and her then-partner.

Trump’s response: 

Hicks responded to the Times’ reporting, denying Harth’s allegations wholesale.

“Mr. Trump denies each and every statement made by Ms. Harth,” she said.

Lisa Boyne

Lisa Boyne

Screenshot/Bustle

Allegations:

Lisa Boyne, a health food business entrepreneur, told HuffPost in October 2016 that she attended a 1996 dinner with Trump and modeling agent John Casablancas during which several other women in attendance were forced to walk across a table in order to leave.

As the women walked on the table, Boyne says that Trump looked up their skirts and commented on their underwear and genitals. Trump allegedly asked Boyne for her opinion on which of the women he should sleep with.

Boyne joined Jessica Leeds, Samantha Holvey, Rachel Crooks — three others who have accused Trump of sexual misconduct — in calling on Congress to investigate Trump in December.

Trump’s response:

Hicks denied Boyne’s allegations. “Mr. Trump never heard of this woman and would never do that,” she told HuffPost.

Mariah Billado and Victoria Hughes

Allegations:

Two Miss Teen USA contestants told BuzzFeed News in October 2016 that Trump walked in on them while they were changing in their dressing rooms.

“I remember putting on my dress really quick because I was like, ‘Oh my god, there’s a man in here,'” Mariah Billado, who represented Vermont in 1997, told BuzzFeed. Billado added that Trump said something along the lines of, “Don’t worry, ladies, I’ve seen it all before.”

Victoria Hughes, a former Miss New Mexico, said Trump first introduced himself to the teenage contestants when he unexpectedly walked into their dressing room.

“It was certainly the most inappropriate time to meet us all for the first time,” she told BuzzFeed.

Trump’s response:

Trump appeared to admit to this behavior when he boasted in an April 2005 interview with radio host Howard Stern that he regularly walked into contestants’ dressing rooms on the beauty pageants he owned while women were unclothed.

“I’ll go backstage before a show and everyone’s getting dressed and ready and everything else. And you know, no men are anywhere. And I’m allowed to go in because I’m the owner of the pageant,” he said. “You know they’re standing there with no clothes. And you see these incredible-looking women. And so I sort of get away with things like that.”

In October 2016, the Trump campaign called the allegations politically motivated lies.

“These accusations have no merit and have already been disproven by many other individuals who were present,” the campaign said in a statement. “When you see questionable attacks like this magically put out there in the final month of a presidential campaign, you have to ask yourself what the political motivations are and why the media is pushing it.”

Temple Taggart

Temple Taggart McDowell

Screenshot/CNN

Allegations:

Temple Taggart, a former Miss Utah, told the New York Times in May 2016 that Trump “kissed me directly on the lips” when she met him at the Miss USA pageant in 1997. Trump did the same thing when Taggart met with him again at Trump Tower in Manhattan after he offered to aid her modeling career, she said.

In November 2017, Taggart spoke out again, telling the Times that the allegations against Trump were “brushed under the rug.”

Trump’s response:

Trump “emphatically” denies Taggart’s claims.

“I don’t even know who she is,” Trump told NBC News in October 2016. “She claims this took place in a public area. I never kissed her. I emphatically deny this ridiculous claim.”

Cathy Heller

Allegations:

Cathy Heller told the Guardian in October 2016 that she was attending a Mother’s Day brunch with her husband, children, and in-laws at Mar-a-Lago in the 1990s when Trump approached her table, introduced himself to her, and forcibly kissed her.

“He took my hand, and grabbed me, and went for the lips,” she said, and added that she was “angry and shaken” as a result of the incident.

Trump’s response:

A Trump campaign spokesman denied Heller’s allegation, arguing that it couldn’t have happened in public.

“There is no way that something like this would have happened in a public place on Mother’s Day at Mr. Trump’s resort,” Jason Miller said. “It would have been the talk of Palm Beach for the past two decades.”

Karena Virginia

Karena Virginia
Karena Virginia (front) with her lawyer, Gloria Allred. 
Richard Drew/AP

Allegations:

Karena Virginia, a yoga instructor and life coach, told the Washington Post in October 2016 that Trump groped her as she waited for her car outside the US Open in New York in 1998.

Virginia, then 27, said she overheard Trump talking with a group of men about her legs and that Trump then approached her, grabbed her arm, and touched her breast before asking, “Don’t you know who I am?”

Trump’s response:

“Give me a break,” Trump representative Jessica Ditto said in response to Virginia’s allegation. “Voters are tired of these circus like antics and reject these fictional stories and the clear efforts to benefit Hillary Clinton.”

Tasha Dixon and Bridget Sullivan

Tasha Dixon
Tasha Dixon. 
Screenshot/CNN

Allegations:

Two Miss USA contestants said Trump walked into their dressing rooms, where female participants were changing, and ogled them.

Tasha Dixon, a former Miss Arizona who competed in the 2001 Miss USA pageant, told CBS in October 2016 that Trump walked into the contestants’ dressing room while they were changing.

“He just came strolling right in,” Dixon said. “There was no second to put a robe on or any sort of clothing or anything. Some girls were topless, other girls were naked.”

She added, “To have the owner come waltzing in when we’re naked or half naked in a very physically vulnerable position, and then to have the pressure of the people that work for him telling us to go fawn all over him, go walk up to him, talk to him.”

Dixon said there was “no one to complain to” because Trump owned the pageant and everyone employed there reported to him.

Bridget Sullivan, Miss New Hampshire in 2000, told BuzzFeed News in May 2016 that Trump walked into the contestants’ dressing room unannounced and hugged her inappropriately.

“The time that he walked through the dressing rooms was really shocking. We were all naked,” Sullivan said, comparing Trump to a “creepy uncle.” “He’d hug you just a little low on your back.”

Trump’s response:

In October 2016, the Trump campaign denied Dixon’s allegations, calling them politically motivated fabrications.

“These accusations have no merit and have already been disproven by many other individuals who were present,” the campaign said in a statement. “When you see questionable attacks like this magically put out there in the final month of a presidential campaign, you have to ask yourself what the political motivations are and why the media is pushing it.”

Melinda McGillivray

Melinda McGillivray

Wilfredo Lee/AP

Allegations:

Melinda “Mindy” McGillivray told the Palm Beach Post in October 2016 that Trump grabbed her buttocks while they were backstage during a Ray Charles concert at Mar-a-Lago in 2003.

Ken Davidoff, a photographer present at the concert, said McGillivray, then 23, approached him soon after the incident and said, “Donald just grabbed my a–!”

McGillivray spoke out again on “Megyn Kelly Today” in December, calling for a congressional investigation into the accusations of sexual misconduct against Trump.

“He has to face the music; he can’t get away with this,” McGillivray said. “I want justice.”

Trump’s response:

The Post reported that Trump did not respond to requests for comment concerning McGillivray’s accusation, but the president has broadly denied all of the sexual misconduct accusations made against him.

“The timing and absurdity of these false claims speaks volumes and the publicity tour that has begun only further confirms the political motives behind them,” White House press secretary Sanders said after the TV appearance in December.

Natasha Stoynoff

Natasha Stoynoff

Screenshot/ABC News

Allegations:

People magazine reporter Natasha Stoynoff wrote in an October 2016 column that Trump sexually assaulted her in 2005 at Mar-a-Lago. Stoynoff was visiting Trump and his new wife, Melania, at their Florida estate to report on a story about the couple’s first year of marriage.

While a pregnant Melania was changing clothes for a photoshoot, Trump offered to show Stoynoff a “tremendous” room at the resort.

“We walked into that room alone, and Trump shut the door behind us. I turned around, and within seconds he was pushing me against the wall and forcing his tongue down my throat,” Stoynoff wrote.

She added that Trump told her they would have a sexual affair. “Have you ever been to Peter Luger’s for steaks? I’ll take you. We’re going to have an affair, I’m telling you,” he allegedly said.

Trump’s response:

Trump denied the allegations, tweeting last year, “Why didn’t the writer of the twelve year old article in People Magazine mention the ‘incident’ in her story. Because it did not happen!”

Jennifer Murphy and Juliet Huddy

Jennifer Murphy
Jennifer Murphy. 
Mario Anzuoni/AP

Allegations:

Two women have said Trump kissed them without their consent, but that they weren’t offended by it at the time.

Juliet Huddy, a former Fox News anchor, said on the “Mornin!!! With Bill Schulz” podcast in December 2017 that Trump kissed her on the lips without her consent after a meeting in Trump Tower in Manhattan in 2005 or 2006.

“He went to say goodbye and he, rather than kiss me on the cheek, he leaned in on the lips,” she said. Huddy added that she was surprised by the kiss, but “didn’t feel threatened” or “offended” at the time.

“Now that I’ve matured, I would’ve said, ‘Nope.’ At that time, I was making excuses,” she said in December.

Jennifer Murphy, a former contestant both in Miss USA and Trump’s reality TV show “The Apprentice,” told Grazia magazine in December 2016 that Trump kissed her unexpectedly following a job interview in Trump Tower in 2005.

Although Murphy said she was “very taken aback at the time,” she later told CNN that she “wasn’t offended” by the kiss. She said she voted for him for president, and even created a Katy Perry parody video in which she sang, “I was kissed by Trump and I liked it.”

Amee Vanderpool@girlsreallyrule

Trump’s response:

The White House denied Huddy’s account, according to the New York Daily News.

Rachel Crooks

Rachel Crooks

Monica Schipper/Getty Images

Allegations:

Rachel Crooks told the New York Times in October 2016 that Trump kissed her on the mouth without her consent when she introduced herself him in 2005 Trump Tower in Manhattan, where she worked as a receptionist.

She told the Times that she and Trump shook hands and then he kissed her “directly on the mouth.”

Crooks told her sister, who confirmed her account to the Times, but said she thought she would lose her job if she told her company anything about the interaction.

“I was shocked, devastated,” she said during a December 2017 interview on “Megyn Kelly Today,” adding: “I remember hiding in our boss’ office because no one else was there, it was early in the morning, and I called my sister … I felt horrible.”

Crooks joined calls for a congressional investigation into Trump’s alleged misconduct.

Trump’s response:

Trump denied Crooks’ account in an interview with the New York Times in October 2016. “None of this ever took place,” he said, threatening to sue the Times if it reported on the allegations.

Samantha Holvey

Samantha Holvey

Monica Schipper/Getty Images

Allegations:

Samantha Holvey, a contestant in the 2006 Miss USA pageant, which Trump owned, told CNN in October 2016 that Trump personally inspected each of the pageant contestants individually.

“He would step in front of each girl and look you over from head to toe like we were just meat, we were just sexual objects, that we were not people,” Holvey said, adding that it made her feel “the dirtiest I felt in my entire life.”

Then a 20-year-old student at a private Southern Baptist college, Holvey said she “had no desire to win when I understood what it was all about.”

Holvey also called for a congressional investigation into Trump’s alleged misconduct.

Trump’s response: 

CNN, who first reported on Holvey’s allegations, said Trump did not respond to requests for comment, but the president has broadly denied all of the sexual misconduct accusations made against him.

Allegations:

Ninni Laaksonen, a model and former Miss Finland, told Finnish newspaper Ilta-Sanomat in October 2016 that Trump groped her backstage at the “Late Show with David Letterman” in 2006.

“Trump stood right next to me and suddenly he squeezed my butt,” Laaksonen said. “He really grabbed my butt. I don’t think anybody saw it, but I flinched and thought, ‘What is happening?'”

Trump’s response:

The newspaper did not include a response from Trump, but the president has broadly denied all of the sexual misconduct accusations made against him.

Jessica Drake

Jessica Drake

Kevork Djansezian/Reuters

Allegations:

At an October 2016 press conference, adult-film actress Jessica Drake accused Trump of grabbing and kissing her without permission and offering her money to accept a private invitation to his penthouse hotel room in Lake Tahoe in 2006.

“This is not acceptable behavior for anyone, much less a presidential candidate,” Drake said. “I understand that I may be called a liar or an opportunist, but I will risk that in order to stand in solidarity with women who share similar accounts that span many, many years.”

Trump’s response:

Trump called Drake’s accusations “total fiction” and implied that Drake was accustomed to being “grabbed” because she is a porn actress.

“One said, ‘He grabbed me on the arm.’ And she’s a porn star. You know, this one that came out recently, ‘He grabbed me and he grabbed me on the arm.’ Oh, I’m sure she’s never been grabbed before,” he said on WGIR radio.

Summer Zervos

Summer Zervos

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Allegations:

Summer Zervos, a former contestant on NBC’s “The Apprentice,” told reporters at an October 2016 press conference that Trump assaulted her during a 2007 meeting at The Beverly Hills Hotel.

“He then grabbed my shoulder and began kissing me again very aggressively and placed his hand on my breast,” she said. “I pulled back and walked to another part of the room. He then walked up, grabbed my hand, and pulled me into the bedroom. I walked out.” Zervos added that Trump thrust himself on her before she left the room.

Zervos sued Trump for defamation after he accused her of lying about the allegations. Trump’s attorneys have moved to dismiss the case, arguing that, as president, he can’t be sued in state court and that his remarks about his accusers are political speech. The suit is ongoing.

Trump’s response:

“I vaguely remember Ms. Zervos as one of the many contestants on ‘The Apprentice’ over the years,” Trump said in a statement. “To be clear, I never met her at a hotel or greeted her inappropriately a decade ago. That is not who I am as a person, and it is not how I’ve conducted my life. In fact, Ms. Zervos continued to contact me for help, emailing my office on April 14 of this year asking that I visit her restaurant in California.”

Cassandra Searles

Cassandra Searles

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Allegations:

Cassandra Searles, who represented the state of Washington at the 2013 Miss USA pageant, wrote in a June 2016 Facebook post that Trump treated herself and other female Miss USA contestants “like cattle” and had them “lined up so he could get a closer look at his property.”

“He probably doesn’t want me telling the story about that time he continually grabbed my ass and invited me to his hotel room,” she added.

Trump’s response: 

Trump has not specifically denied Searles’ allegations, but he has broadly denied all of the sexual misconduct accusations made against him.

Alva Johnson

Donald Trump campaign rally
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump holds a campaign rally in Naples, Florida, U.S. October 23, 2016. 
Thomson Reuters

Allegations:

Alva Johnson, a former Trump campaign staffer, said that Trump kissed her without her consent at a Tampa, Florida rally on August 24, 2016.

Johnson, 43, said Trump grabbed her hand and kissed her on the side of her mouth as he exited an RV outside of the rally, according to details in a new federal lawsuit and an interview with the Washington Post.

“Oh, my God, I think he’s going to kiss me,” Johnson said in a February 2019 interview with the Post. “He’s coming straight for my lips. So I turn my head, and he kisses me right on the corner of my mouth, still holding my hand the entire time. Then he walks on out.”

Johnson filed a federal lawsuit against Trump in February.

Trump’s response: 

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told INSIDER in a statement, “This accusation is absurd on its face. This never happened and is directly contradicted by multiple highly credible eye witness accounts.”

E. Jean Carroll

E. Jean Carroll in 2004.
E. Jean Carroll in 2004. 
Michael Stuparyk/Getty Images

Allegations:

Former Elle advice columnist E. Jean Carroll accused President Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her by pinning her against the wall and forcing his penis inside of her in a department store dressing room the mid-1990s.

“The moment the dressing-room door is closed, he lunges at me, pushes me against the wall, hitting my head quite badly, and puts his mouth against my lips,” Carroll wrote in an excerpt of her 2019 book,”What Do We Need Men For?”.

She went on, “The next moment, still wearing correct business attire, shirt, tie, suit jacket, overcoat, he opens the overcoat, unzips his pants, and, forcing his fingers around my private area, thrusts his penis halfway — or completely, I’m not certain — inside me. It turns into a colossal struggle.”

Trump’s response: 

The White House denied Carroll’s allegations in a statement to New York magazine in June 2019.

“This is a completely false and unrealistic story surfacing 25 years after allegedly taking place and was created simply to make the President look bad,” the statement read.

Karen Johnson

President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, with their son Barron, arrive for a New Year's Eve party at his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida in 2017.
President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, with their son Barron, arrive for a New Year’s Eve party at his Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida in 2017. 
Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Karen Johnson, a regular at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, said Trump pulled her behind a tapestry and kissed and groped her without her consent during a New Year’s Eve party there in the early 2000s.

“I’m a tall girl and I had six-inch heels on, and I still remember looking up at him. And he’s strong, and he just kissed me,” Johnson said. “I was so scared because of who he was … I don’t even know where it came from. I didn’t have a say in the matter.”

Johnson said Trump forcibly grabbed her genitals.

“When he says that thing, ‘Grab them in the pussy,’ that hits me hard because when he grabbed me and pulled me into the tapestry, that’s where he grabbed me,” she said, according to the book excerpt.

Johnson said Trump called her repeatedly after the incident, offering to fly her to New York to visit him. She said she refused his advances and never saw him again or visited Mar-a-Lago, where she’d had her wedding reception years earlier.

Trump’s response:

The White House denied the allegation and slammed “All the President’s Women.”

“That book is trash and those accusations from 20 years ago have been addressed many times,” the White House press secretary, Stephanie Grisham, told Insider.

Story Credit- By – usiness insider

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